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Oral Presentation Video Feedback: Inserting “Spot-On” Comments

Page history last edited by Tera Meschko 9 years, 1 month ago

Oral Presentation Video Feedback: Inserting “Spot-On” Comments

 

Primary Presenter: Hanna Yang

Co-Presenter: Lauren Scharff

Organization: U.S. Air Force Academy

Role: Assistant professor of Law

Track: Research Presentation

Level: For Mere Mortals 

 

Abstract: This study investigated whether the addition of interjected video feedback improves oral presentation skills more than summative global feedback alone. Interjected video feedback consists of instructor comments that are inserted into a video of a student’s presentation, much like subtitles. In addition to presenting data, various technology options will be discussed.

 

Bio: Capt Hanna Yang has worked an instructor teaching multiple law courses each semester at the U.S. Air Force Academy for 2 academic years. Prior to that she served as an assistant staff judge advocate. She has attended multiple faculty development activities and led a Scholarship of Teaching and Learning project during the spring 2012 semester.

 

Description: This presentation will share 1) outcome data from a Scholarship of Teaching and Learning research project that assessed the impact of interjected video feedback on the development of students’ oral presentation skills, and 2) technology options for video capture and insertion of feedback. Interjected video feedback consists of instructor comments that are inserted into a video of a student’s presentation, much like subtitles. Insertion of instructor’s feedback comments allows students to easily note their behaviors at a specific point in time that correspond with those comments, i.e. “spot-on” comments. In contrast, oral presentation feedback typically consists of a global summary of general observations that are difficult to link back to specific points in the presentation. For the research project, students in a Spring 2012, sophomore-level Law course were provided a video of their first oral presentation along with either global feedback or both global feedback and interjected comments. Students then reviewed and reflected on their video and the feedback before their next oral presentation. The impact of the feedback was assessed by comparing the improvement of oral presentation skills (Content, Organization, Style, and Response to Audience) between the two groups. Students also completed a feedback form after their second oral presentation, which gathered subjective/affective responses about the impact of the feedback they received. We will engage participants by walking through the process to interject comments, showing actual example video clips, and engaging the participants in discussion about the project, practical challenges, and the variety of possible technologies available. The technology actually used in the project was low-cost (hand-held video camera), and the video software was free, so participants should be able to easily implement the approach in their own courses.

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